As we have written here previously, businesses across the country have brought lawsuits against their insurers seeking coverage for losses related to COVID-19. According to the COVID Coverage Litigation Tracker at the University of Pennsylvania Carey Law School, over 1,500 suits have been filed since March 2020 in state and federal court. Some interesting statistics

Last week, the Securities and Exchange Commission’s Division of Examinations (the “Division”) released its 2021 examination priorities.  The priorities reflect the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, including how it has increased risks related to cybersecurity; a new focus on climate change; and appear to recognize concerns raised by the recent trading in GameStop stock.

The recently issued 2021 Report on FINRA’s Examination and Risk Monitoring Program (the “Report”) replaces, and combines, two previously published FINRA reports – The Report on Examination Findings and Observations as well as the Risk Monitoring and Examination Program Priorities Letter. The Report addresses key regulatory topics in four categories: (1) Firm Operations; (2) Communications

Following up on our prior discussion of Studio 417, Inc., et al. v. The Cincinnati Ins. Comp., a different federal judge in the Western District of Missouri recently ruled in Zwillo V, Corp. v. Lexington Insurance Co. that a Kansas City restaurant could not recover for COVID-19 business interruption losses under an insurance policy