The Supreme Court decided two cases today, and though neither of them presents the sort of widely consequential matter that, say, the President’s student loan forgiveness plan that was argued this morning does, each has interesting aspects. Both are decided on the now-vogueish doctrine of textualism, though each shows divisions among the Justices that prove again that not only can Justices who have differing jurisprudential philosophies agree with one another as to statutory meaning, but that Justices with the same jurisprudential philosophy can disagree with one another on text as well. Thus, while there are cases, like Dobbs, where one might accurately predict the outcome on the basis of philosophy or alignment with the preferences of the President who nominated various Justices, there is a host of cases where labels don’t hold up at all.

Continue Reading Unusual Groupings of Justices Decide Two Cases Involving Contradictory Applications of Textualism – SCOTUS Today

The Court has broken the logjam of pending opinions, rendering three decisions today, one of which, dealing with the issue of when overtime pay is mandated under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), might have a broader effect. So, let’s start with that one: Helix Energy Solutions Group, Inc. v. Hewitt.

Continue Reading High-Earning Worker Entitled to Overtime Pay, Death-Row Inmate Can Challenge Punishment, and Bankruptcy Can’t Discharge Fraudulent Debt – SCOTUS Today